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Sunday, 28 December 2014

Graphene for Body Armour & Armoured Baseball Cap:


Graphene (a form of carbon) is claimed to have been isolated by The University of Manchester (U.K.) and can be formed into sheets that are only one atom thick - and are 100 times stronger than steel.

Graphene Sheet.
 
Tests are suggesting that pure graphene will perform twice as well as fabrics currently used in bullet-proof vests. Multiple layers perhaps in a composite  structure show great promise but - if / when this body armour is issued - don't smoke while wearing it - as graphene is highly chemically reactive - 100 times more than thicker sheets - and will burn at low temperatures (300. degrees C). ( A glowing cigarettes temperature rises to 1292 degrees F - 700 deg. C )!
 
Manufacture of graphene is commencing at several plants in the North-East of England.
 
Artists impression !
- Don't Mess With Me - I'm Bullet-proof.
 
- Coming soon - Maybe.

----------

 - Meanwhile, 'Bulletsafe' USA are developing a bullet-proof baseball cap that will help protect the central processor.

 
  - Neat eh, - but would I trade-in my old IPSC NZ cap for one? - maybe - if it looked a bit more "shootist"! - How about some bullet loops on the sides? ;-)


That range looks (and the extractor fan sounds) a little like my old Manchester Street "Dungeon" Range - now long closed, earth-quaked and gone from the map.

 
Marty K.

Friday, 26 December 2014

R.I.P Projectiles:

 
G2 Research are keeping busy with an expanding range of their projectiles: Their "last bullet you will need" claim certainly looks realistic to me even at around US$2 a shot for defensive handgun ammunition there in The States. If I were a "bad boy" in USA - I'd be giving serious thought to retirement.
 
- Georgia Based 'G2 Research' machine their new projectiles from solid copper using CNC machinery.
 

RIP rounds Loaded for a Glock.

These Radically Invasive Projectiles - engineered from copper, are very impressive - as shown in these SLO-MO Gel tests off youtube:

9MM R I P.
 
And a new-to-me 300 Blackout round is being called "300 RIP OUT":
 
 
- And as I've observed before - this ammunition might be regarded as "green' because it is 100% 'lead-free'.

'Trident' Rounds Are Latest.

- But the 'Trident'  bullets used in .300 Blackout calibre are a different concept that doesn't break-up into separate fragments - but rather the solid copper bullet is engineered to expand and peel-back into a large three-petalled form that looks very serious to me.

Sub-sonic or "super.." they are covering all the bases.

- Long term prospects for any animal hit by these designer bullets are not looking too good.

Marty K.



Thursday, 25 December 2014

Top 10 weapons of The Future:


Bearing in mind that this is currently "The Season of Good Will etc." - I perversely want to point-out just what our Governments of elected representatives have been preparing to use against the rest of us - while simultaneously trying to control, limit, or eliminate small arms from our hands.
Current Tasers. (X26P is latest version)


The "New Scientist" published this list of what "future weapons" they saw coming - some 20 years ago:

1/ Autonomous Weapons: Drones, Remote controlled attack weapons. - Reach-out and touch someone.

2/ High Energy Lasers: Require high energy sources and are bulky.

3/ Space Based Weapons: Anti-ballistic Missile Systems.

4/ Hypersonic Aircraft: Faster than Mach 5.5

5/ Active Denial System: Micro-waving people to force them to back-off (- or cook).

6/ Nuclear Missiles: Tens of thousands of these terribly destructive weapons  already deployed.

7/ Stun Guns: Tasers etc. - now well distributed and in use.

8/ E-Bombs: High Energy microwave pulses to disrupt electronics / computers.

9/ Layered Missile Defence: Moves in & out of fashion regularly - but popular with Israel.

10/ Information warfare: Computer Hackers ( called 'Crackers' by the in crowd?) overload computers and spread 'viruses'. - Interesting recent claimed use by North Korea on Sony's movie publicity campaign.
----------
- Good guesses I'd say, from twenty years ago.

- A difficulty we work under is government secrecy - when information of anything 'new' is released you can guarantee that it is already obsolete and has been superseded and replaced.

JHSV-3 'USNV Millinocket'  Armed with a rail-gun - launched 5 June 2013.

For example we don't know how well developed is the Boeing X-51 Hypersonic Aircraft - that went 'hyper' in 2013. - And how are they doing with electro-magnetic 'Rail Guns' ?

Boeing X-51.

- Makes my Ruger revolvers look "agricultural" and antique - but they're still fun eh.

Marty K.

Tuesday, 23 December 2014

U.S. Increased Support For Gun Ownership:


- After more than twenty years of negativity - The U.S. 'Pew Research Centre' national survey released 10 December reports that 52% say it is more important to protect gun ownership rights - and only 46% supported more control of gun ownership.

Quiet a turn-around.

Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver - But Not In NZ.

There are lots of detailed statistics in the report - You may find it worth googling for a read.

- When considering the issues - keep in mind at all times that licensed ownership of a firearm for "self-defence" in New Zealand is not permitted.

Except for sworn Police Officers that is. This is a case of "Don't do as I do - Do as I say".

Marty K.

Monday, 22 December 2014

Home-Made SPLATTER Targets:


I really like those clever paper targets that show a fluorescent margin to your bullet holes - making a hit with a .22" look like a .44 Magnum.

- What I don't like is the retail asking price here .. only  NZ$45 for x12 "Splattering" targets (Birchwood Casey).

 - Is that really $3.75 EACH for paper targets?
I wonder how many they are selling.

Very Useful - But also Lots of Fun to Use.
 
- I had been applying my 'grey matter'  to dreaming-up some way of making something similar (but no doubt inferior) - maybe using a fluro coloured rubberised under paint coverered with a layer of some cheap blackboard paint that would chip-off when excited - But here's a better idea the chef prepared and cooked earlier.

Video posted by All Outdoor - Thank you.
 
- Well done that man (or woman inventor) - I'll get on-to-it (similar to "a round-tuit" ) next time I'm in town - but meanwhile my head has leapt forward to thoughts of my rubbish bin and examining the empty 'tetra-packs'  that my fruit-juice and soy-milk comes-in. - Unfold those bent-over 'ears' and ..
 
 High Tech Multi-layered Throw-Away Packaging.
 
- Now I reckon that maybe, slit open & and flattened-out after some kitchen scissor surgery - this laminated card could be a great base for a coat of blackboard matt black spray paint and with a few bright coloured patches stuck on - then stapled on the target stand. - I'll have to get a 'round tuit' .
 
Re-cycle, re-cycle .. So the spray-can of paint cost $17 - but should do for several attempts and a pack of bright orange patches was nearly $10 but will be useful generally for target use..

The chalkboard paint seems to readily chip-off from the polythene coating so this whole experiment looks hopeful. - If you wondered why the display pack of  "AA Energiser 50% longer lasting 'Power Boost' cells" is in the picture - IT'S BECAUSE EVERY TIME I WANT TO USE THE CAMERA - THE ****** BATTERIES ARE DEAD.

Oh, was I shouting? - still it all adds authenticity to my story - but the cost is mounting-up eh


I'll have to come-back with the victorious 'shots' (of my shots) later as I can't loose-off in my garden - so we will all need to be patient !

Seasons Greetings and all that, I'm off to honey bake a ham.
 
Marty K.

Saturday, 20 December 2014

It's Turkey Season - Gobble-gobble..gravy:


While there are several dedicated turkey farms around New Zealand (- I get used turkey house litter for my veggie garden) - we also have wild feral birds in many areas. Our British heritage still strongly suggests roast turkey, ham-on-the-bone, and all the trimmings despite the summer weather and sweltering heat we sometimes have in the December holidays.


These birds have no doubt often escaped from farms - but the earliest release of the North American birds is recorded on Kawau Island in the 1860s. - Turkeys were feral through-out the Hawkes Bay district by 1894.

The birds here favour rough lowland farmland where there are scattered trees in many areas of the North Island, Marlborough Sounds, Central Otago and scattered areas of the South Island East coast.

Wild turkey is good to eat with the breast meat being favoured by most - as the thigh meat of wild birds tends to be dark & tough - but can be used if care is taken not to let it dry-out and harden further (try sausages). Wild animal meat will usually be healthier to eat, as any sickly animals die soon in the absence of anti-biotics etc. - the survivors being generally fit and healthy good-to-eat natural foods.

I've been told the wild turkey is best shot for the pot here in the months not having an "R" - so that's May, June, July, August - our winter when the birds meat is not tainted by eating too many crickets.

Spot them when they're having "a bit of bovver" and you'll likely get two for the one shot:

Male Birds 'Having a Go'
 
Number 4, or 6 shot - whichever best suits your gun patterning - will get the job done. I hear that a .22" WMR or .223" from an AR15 will also do a great job - but do check the rules for your particular local.
 
Sub-Sonic .22 R.F is Less Than Ideal But..
 
Roast Turkey and 'stuffing', - baked-ham,  new potatoes with mint, asparagus and fresh young peas all swimming in gravy - (for Christmas here - but 'Thanksgiving' in USA)
 
Life is good.
 
Marty K
 
 








Thursday, 18 December 2014

SEEALL Open Sight:

'Neville' sent me a photo lead to this new American sight.


This innovative development uses 'fibre-optic' technology to gather ambient light into a yellow/green tinted block where the sighting image is viewed through a clear magnifying lens - all mounted safely in an aluminium block that locks onto accessory rails.

 You are meant to shoot these with both eyes open.


- No Batteries ! Hmm - very interesting - solid looking but a bit 'blockie' - and doesn't seem to be too expensive at under US$100.

- I've never really got-on with any of the battery powered red-dot sights - but I love the glowing fibre-optic front sight on my Ruger SP101 .22"R.F. revolver - so..

'SEE-ALL'  Sight picture.

- Could be just the thing for my 9mm JRC Carbine - but I bet that there'll be a Mk2 or another makers version on the market shortly (probably making them in China!) that will be neater and cheaper. - I'll wait and see what turns-up in our kiwi gun shops in the new year.

Maybe another (late) Xmas prezzie !

Life is good,

Marty K.

Wednesday, 17 December 2014

Abel Tasman 18 December 1642. Shots Fired:

It is now some 372 years since Dutchman Abel Janszoon Tasman made the first European approach to New Zealand and engaged in the first known armed fighting against Maori warriors.

Ship Zeehaen.

Tasman sailing on his flagship The Heemskerck together with the armed transport Zeehaen first sighted land in the West Coast of the South Island on December 13 1642.

On 18th December they were off-shore at Golden Bay when two Maori waka (canoes) approached and challenged them - blowing sea-shell trumpets - Tasmans crew replied by blowing their trumpets and firing a cannon before the Maori (warriors from Ngati Tumatakokiri tribe) returned to land.

- Next day seven canoes came out to the Dutch vessels and one waka rammed a small ships boat and in the fighting four Dutch crewmen were killed with clubs. The ships fought-off the attack using swords, pikes, and muskets and firing their cannon.

17th Century Ships Cannon.
 
- As they weighed anchor and set sail to depart - eleven maori canoes came out and Tasmans Crew fired upon them hitting the lead canoe and one man with canister shot. - Tasman named the area Moordenaers Bay.

Moordenaers (Murderers) Bay. Anchored in 15 Fathoms of water 1642.
 
- 372 years ago - score : NZ Maori  4 - Holland 1.
 
Today, this part of the South Island, now called Golden Bay and The Abel Tasman Park still get plenty of overseas visitors who enjoy the canoeing - and maybe visit Nelson Pistol Club.
 
Sea canoeing Abel Tasman Park - Golden Bay.
 
Marty K.

Tuesday, 16 December 2014

Bushmaster To Be Sued:

Media are reporting that ten families of the Sandy Hook massacre victims are to file a joint lawsuit against Bushmaster Firearms International and associated companies - claiming that there is no legitimate purpose for such guns to be sold.

A Bushmaster Rifle.
 
I think that these poor folk are misguided and are going to sue the wrong people.
 
- 20 year old Adam Lanza who shot and killed 26 before shooting himself suffered "significant mental health issues" and "exhibited anti-social behaviour".
 
 
Lanza who had been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, sensory-integration disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, - changed his socks twenty times a day and communicated with his mother - who he lived with - only by e-mail.

He was also Anorexic and weighed only 112 lbs (50 kg.) despite being six foot plus tall.

Can you think of anyone else who might be better sued than the manufacturers for permitting this mentally abnormal person to be free to unlawfully arm himself ?? - like the U.S. Mental Health Authorities and Government - or about a 100 other responsible people who failed society?

- there used to be a common phrase - "A bad worker always blames his tools"

- when all else fails, blame the gun!

- Just a thought.

Marty K.

Monday, 15 December 2014

Video - How The Kalashnikov is Made And Checked:


Mike Foxtrot posted this 2012 Video movie about the "Kalash" - Well worth taking the time to view it eh. - Good work Mike F.

Kalashnikov Movie is about 26 Minutes long.
 
- Sad the old man has now passed but I think that he did make some Bucks in his later days, at least from the Kalashnikov Vodka. - Cheers!
 
Marty K.

P.S. A wee birdie tells me that somebody whos' name begins with M (not me) has a Xmas pressie of a New Frontier Armoury AR15 'A' Cat rifle.. 16 inch barrel with a suppressor.

- The hills are alive - with the sound of music .....   (soon).

Marty K.

Sunday, 14 December 2014

NZ Police Firearms Advisory Forum - Raised Costs:


I've just had a couple of e-mailed 'heads-ups' that The NZ Police Community Firearms Advisory Forum held its latest meeting on December 3rd.

The pdf said that topics presented were as follows:

Arms Trade Treaty - Brokering Legislation - and the need for a legal definition of what a Broker is.

NZ Police want to have the ability to issue "Firearms Prohibition Orders' similar in type to those used by Australian Authorities. These would prohibit possession of firearms by some individuals and groups and have heavier penalties than those currently provided for.

NZ Police raised the topic of cost recovery related to their issuing of Permits - particularly IMPORT PERMITS - saying that they are having to issue more with less resources/finance available.

The fifth item raised was that they intend to amend the Firearms Act to add clarification about converting 'A' Category firearms (good guns!) into 'E' Category(bad guns!) - and their Registration.

The following photographs attempt to illustrate the problem they (& The Honourable John Banks) have made for us all:

'A' Cat Non-Registered Rifle.
 
'E' Cat Registered Rifle.
**
 
Sounds like all we licensed 'fit & proper' shooters will be paying much increased fees in future to help the Authorities impose further obstructive interpretations of their home-made regulations
 
 - such as: if your properly licensed Import Permit states Auckland as the port of entry - and the aircraft is diverted due to weather to Christchurch - you will be required to apply and pay for another Import Permit to replace the invalidated Permit !!. (At a fee set to cover their increased costs).
 
 - Remember that this importation may be for a small part such as a coil spring or other tiny component, screw, rivet, pin.

** : The removable magazine (clip) holds one more cartridge.
 
Marty K.
 

Thursday, 11 December 2014

Early Double Action Colts Used S.A Front-end

The Colt 1878 Double -Action 'Frontier' Model was the first double-action Colt & was based on the Single Action Army Model. It used the same barrel and ejector system as the S.A. Army model and used very similar cylinders.

Two Colt D.A. Model 1878 Revolvers .44LC and 44-40 Calibres.
 
The double- action function was a simple modification** that added a strut that connects the trigger action to the hammer. The trigger top slips past the strut so that the hammer will stay on full cock when manually cocked by pulling the hammer back.
 
The first double-action Revolver from Colt with a 'Swing-out' Cylinder released by a sliding latch was the Colt New Navy Model of 1889 and these were mostly made in.38 short & long Colt calibre although .41 short & long Colt were also available. This models cylinder rotated anti-clockwise rather than previous guns clock-wise rotation - possibly a requirement of the US Navy.
 
 
Colt Model 1889-1895 - First Swing-out Cylinder Model.
 
- Don't ask me any detailed questions about these early Colts - as I don't know anything! - The most that I can say is that I was once driving my car - registration number 'GLOCK 1' on the motorway into Dunedin for an antique Arms Auction and was overtaken by a car with the private registration plate 'COLT'. - That's all I know about Colts !
 
- Try Wikipedia.
 
- But those 1878 D.A. guns are a bit of a strange 'hybrid' eh - being S.A. types that could dance D.A..
 
Marty K.

P.S. : ** It seems that my source, 'Guns of The Old West' by C E Chapel, may be faulty in describing the first Colt D.A. six-guns action - hence Rods e-mail below:

"Hi Marty,  Far from a 'simple strut that connected the trigger to the hammer' the early double action Colts were a complex and fragile mechanism. The only parts which were the same as the Single Action were the barrel and ejector assembly. Every other part was purpose built for the new models.
They were notorious for the fragility of their mechanisms (I have repaired several of them over the years) and in fact, right through to the Python, the Colt mechanisms were never as good as the Smith & Wesson. The Colt system used a vee spring which activated both the trigger and the hammer and they 'stacked' or became heavier in the pull as the trigger was pulled. Despite the high quality of their manufacture, the Colts never threatened the S&W's for popularity.
Cheers, Rod"

Marty K.
 

Sunday, 7 December 2014

More "Mr Explorer" Douglas & His Gear:

- Some diary extracts from 1891.. Exploring up the Waiatoto River:

Friday 30 January: "Good weather at last and the River down to nearly its snow melting level. Started in the canoe - 'The Surveyor General' - with the remainder of load. Load consists of two Batwing Tents & two flys - can be pitched as a 6x5 tent or halved making two camps to stage tucker. A bill hook, half axe & pick, Field books Compass Drawing & writing material, a Pea rifle and 'Betsey Jane'* to catch birds, and about 100 lbs of assorted Tucker."

* Over time dogs were two 'Betsey Jane's and 'Topsy', and Poker later.

Charlie Douglas in his 'Batwing' Tent' (Fly Tent) in the bush Above The Franz Joseph Glacier.

Thursday 5 March 1891: "Weather clearing up but putting more snow on the hills. Hope to get away tomorrow, as I am on quarter rations flour, no tea or sugar, but fortunately plenty of birds and tobacco. I have got awfully stiff and lazy laying up cramped in a tent.."

Saturday 7 March 1891: "Today my swag would probably have sunk, as I had a rifle, axe & a lot of rocks & very little else. But I had two good billies, & I rolled them empty in the centre of the swag, with their lids tightened on with a strip of greased calico, & I am sure that swag would have kept me above water for half an hour. A bundle of flax sticks broken into small pieces & jammed into a bag will float a man easily, but the art of safe fording is to always select a place with the current running into a back. You are out & clawing up on the shore almost before you are aware that you have got washed off your feet."

Sunday 10 May: .. " I never expected the adventure I had after dark. The river was certainly high, within three foot of the camp, which I thought was sufficient, but at seven o'clock it commenced to rise fast and in a few minutes put out the fire. I just had time to hurry everything into a bag blanket and make for high ground when the river appeared to come down in one Big Wave. Hurrying back to the tent to get the fly off and secure some charred ends, I met Betsey Jane swimming ashore with the pup in her mouth.

I got the fly off and found one boot, but no trousers, coat or shirt; here was a fix to be in. It was pouring with rain, bitter cold, pitch dark and nothing on but flannel and drawers fortunately I had plenty of candles and matches safe. and having found the tomahawk I started an illumination and pitched the fly in a sort of a way. So far so good, but I must have a fire some way or other. Searching for dry wood in a dark bush was out of the question, so I had to go back to the tent and dive in three feet of water for charred ends and a junk or two of rata. I soon got a fire started, and made up mind to sit cramped before it till morning, but about 1 o'clock the rain knocked off and the river went down as fast as it rose. So I lighted two candles and fixed up the camp again, made a roaring fire of Rata, dryed and the blankets, and turned in about four o'clock."

- Fortunately 'Mr Explorer' the next day managed to find the missing boot, shirt & trousers buried in the mud and spent the day washing and drying them!

Hard times and hard men for sure.

Note: 'A Pea Rifle' used to refer to a small bore muzzle-loader - but rim-fire cartridges having been around since the 1850s suggests to me that Charlie might likely mean a .22" R.F rifle.

Marty K

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Mr 'Explorer' Douglas (1840-1916) Kiwis for Bush Tucker:

I risk again exposing my ignorance by telling you how I only discovered Charlie Douglas last week in an old 2005 'Fish & Game' magazine in a hospital waiting room!


- No I'm fine - I'd driven my 'ex' in for a check-up appointment and subsequently I up-cycled and re-homed the magazine - and managed to later buy a rare copy of an old book from our NZ on-line auction site 'Trademe'.

'Charlie' Washing clothes in a river - Using Mountain Rivers as a route into the peaks is known as "Boulder Hopping".

The 1957 book 'Mr Explorer Douglas' edited by John Pascoe tells of Charlies work exploring, map making, and living off the land while bush-bashing. - If you're interested - there were several copies of the book offered for sale.

What grabbed me first was his use of local birdlife for food - his faithful dog Betsy would roam the bush and daily bring into camp native ground dwelling birds (now protected & endangered) that would be gratefully added into the stew-pot.

The second attraction was his witty writing style - here are some quotes:

" The barometer doesn't affect the weather much on the Coast" (South Westland rain forest, where Mr Explorer Douglas worked is notorious for its high rainfall and sand-flies).

"The hot spring near the Fox (Glacier) smelled badly enough to cure anything".



- Talking about our National Emblem - the Kiwi - "The best definition I ever heard about roast or boiled kiwi was that it tasted 'like a piece of pork boiled in an old coffin"

Scots born 'Mr Explorer Douglas' seems to be not well known - but deserves to be included with the better known pioneers like Brunner, Haast, Hooker, Godley & 'Arawata Bill' for his explorations of this wild, wet, and dangerous terrain of Southern Westland.

Eels, native fish and birds like the bush-hen (Weka) all went into the pot - and his recipes for eating kiwi seem to have involved boiling for two - four hours - and tell the story of hard going and hunger. There are several lakes, passes, glaciers and peaks named Douglas after him.

Note: Charlie Douglas is recorded as saying that NOT being able to swim had often saved his life - by making him more cautious crossing rivers. - Drowning at river crossings was so frequent a cause of death in early NZ that it was known as "The New Zealand Death"

I'm looking forward to a slow read of this book of his early days in New Zealand.

Marty K.

Friday, 5 December 2014

Sheriff David Clarke says it as it is:

I picked-up the "lead" to this video from 'Mike Foxtrot' in Ireland;


Sheriff David Clark sure stirred-up some debate in Millwaukee - and on national TV with notorious anti-gunner Piers Morgan.

An interesting public airing of issues. I suggest that you get a calming cup of coffee before watching the video below.

 
That particular Brit manages to get right up my nose with his overbearing techniques - this is not 'interviewing' or 'debating' - it is controlling and distorting truth by bullying use of microphones and camera editing.

Marty K.

Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Further to The Gel Test Slow-Mo Penetration:


Rod ( gundoc@xtra.co.nz ) responded to our slow-mo jelly wobbles as follows:

"Hi Marty,

Your ballistic gel tests have highlighted a significant fact; all projectiles have a 'sweet' velocity at which they penetrate to their greatest extent. The velocity varies with the construction of the projectile but basically boils down to the highest speed which will NOT cause too much deformation of the bullet.



Obviously the .22 rim-fires were about right but the .223 and the .44 would have penetrated much more at lower velocities. The old FMJ Mk VII .303 could penetrate more than double the amount of earth or dry sand at 600 yards than it could at 100 yards.

Of course it is the high velocity that generates the hydraulic shock wave, coupled with bullet deformation, that gives the high velocity rifle its stopping power.

At the rifles 'sweet' penetrating velocity, the wound would be deep but not usually life-threatening unless a vital organ was hit. Usually people hit in the body with a .22 rim-fire almost always die from the wound, often many days later.

Cheers "

- Very interesting Grasshopper.

- Good to see that you are 'out there' Rod - and keeping an eye out for me and the boys.
____________

- A couple of late notes: First I need to commend Mark I for operating his tripod mounted camera focussed on the gel block - not least of his demonstrated skills was the sprinting back behind the firing line each time after starting the camera mechanism and calling 'fire' as he crossed the line - very sprightly!

- I spotted that some of the discarded gel block seemed to be melting in the bright sunlight as the day progressed - this might indicate that ambient temperature may well be a factor in comparative testing.

- Also interesting that we had an increased number of  'A' Cat classed AR15s out for the day - these modern(ish) light-weights appeal visually and have a wide range of clip-on accessories - resulting in them being called "Mens Barbie".

Life is good,

Marty K.

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

Experiment with 10% Ballistic Gel - in Slow-Motion:

Another great day up-country on our certified club range in Hurunui in the South Island of New Zealand last Sunday - a religious experience for sure..

- Our "cook" J- has been busy brewing-up more edible 'albatross flavour' jelly so we sent a small sample from some shooting tools we had with us down range - through the 'bigger-block'.

SLOW MOTION GEL VIDEO.

- Surprises - for me anyway,- were that the .22" Rim-fires, - both super- and sub- fully penetrated and exited the twelve inch block. - My guess would have been that they'd have fallen short - but obviously their limited cross-sectional area allowed for full penetration.

- It might be that a couple of layers of denim cloth would have changed that.

Also interesting that the .223"  (from an AR15 rifle) plastic-tipped hunting round fully broke-up inside the Gel and didn't exit the block, - but it certainly gave it a hell of a whack when dumping all its energy eh.

- As did too the .44 MAGNUM - no doubting the punch from that big-boy either. - And the 12g Shotgun did its' duty - beyond the call:

12 gauge at four or five metres.
Sectioned Block.


The subsonic 9mm was my home-brewed 158gn copper plated flat-nose running at 900ft-per-sec.

For any of you guys interested in the "Gel-Thing" - 'J' says that it's dead easy to cook-up a mix that "even Walter White would be proud of"! (-should have added some blue ink!)

- He bought 5kg of '200 Bloom' gelatine crystals from Davis Trading Co, Wigram (Christchurch). He just added the contents of a 1kg packet of crystals to 9 litres of water hot from the house tap while telling the missus that he was doing the washing-up? - Whisk it up with a slow(ish) power drill and home-made bent wire whisk - careful not to fill the brew with bubbles. - Empty the fridge (- leaving the beer) - and make room to chill it all off and then listen attentively to the significant others lecture on what is acceptable domestic behaviour.

- You don't want lumps but equally you don't want bubbles - Or maybe a messy divorce either after leaving it in the fridge for three days eh..

 - There are of-course some advantages on being divorced and living alone in the hills - all that house-work but..  I must get the vacuum cleaner out of the spare bedroom some time next year.

P.S. IF you are anywhere near a large block of ballistic gel - do a sly walk-by and give it a flat-hand slap - the whack'n'wobble is most pleasing for any male-chauvinist-pig.

Marty K.